Fall 2019 Courses

AREA 1:  COMMUNICATIONS

HONORS 265G

PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN COMMUNICATION

HONORS 265G M01(3 cr)

Hubbell

TR ●12:00-1:15 PM

 

HONORS 265G M02 (3 cr)

Werner

MW ● 10:30-11:45 AM

 

The fabric of everyday life is woven together by interaction through speaking and listening.  Since oral communication is our primary means of communication, this course will explore how oral communication functions, how it may be managed, and how you can improve your skills.  Specifically, we will cover such topics as verbal communication, intercultural communication, interpersonal communication, listening, and public speaking.  Since this is a general education course, you will be developing your critical thinking skills through a number of oral assignments emphasizing clear organization and advocacy.

AREA2:  MATHEMATICS/ALGEBRA

None this semester.

AREA 3:  LABORATORY SCIENCE

HONORS 219G

EARTH, TIME, AND LIFE

HONORS 219G

Johnson

TR ● 1:30-2:45 PM                      Lab: T ● 3:00-5:50 pm

The primary objective of this course is to gain a general understanding of geology and the geological processes that have been occurring throughout Earth’s history.  The course will begin with a basic introduction to Earth and plate tectonic processes.  As part of this course, we will also learn about some of the common minerals and rocks that are the building blocks to geology and the rock cycle.  We will investigate the processes associated with each rock type (e.g., volcanoes, faults, depositional processes, etc.) and as well as potential geologic hazards (e.g., volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, flooding, etc.).  Upon completion of this course, you will be able to recognize and identify common minerals and rocks and understand the basic processes and conditions responsible for their formation and occurrence.  At the largest scale, this course will provide you with a basic but comprehensive understanding of how the internal and external parts of the Earth have functioned throughout geologic time.

 

AREA 4:  SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE

WORLDS OF ARCHAEOLOGY: SEARCH FOR THE PAST

HONORS 237G (3 cr)

A.Scotten

TR ●10:30 – 11:45 AM

A critical evaluation of various approaches to understanding prehistory and history. The methods and theories of legitimate archaeology are contrasted with fantastic claims that invoke extraterrestrials, global catastrophes, transoceanic voyages, and extra-sensory perception.

 

THE CITIZEN AND THE STATE: GREAT POLITICAL ISSUES

HONORS 248G (3 cr)

C. Slaton

TR ● 1:30 – 2:45 PM

Wars, elections, marches, lawmaking, terrorism and genocide –why do they happen and why does it matter to our lives?  As global politics have shifted in recent years, we need to return to the fundamental questions of politics: Why and how are societies organized for political action?  What values do they express, and how do they attempt to achieve their goals?  This seminar will seek to clarify the meaning of such terms as freedom, justice, democracy, terrorism, fascism, liberalism, conservatism, anarchy and civil disobedience.

Dr. Christa Slaton is a professor in the Department of Government.

 

AREA 5:  HUMANITIES AND FINE ARTS

FOUNDATIONS OF WESTERN CULTURE

HONORS 222G (3 cr)

E. Horodowich

TR ●10:30 – 11:45 AM

Critical reading of seminal texts relating to the foundations of culture and values in Western civilization, from ancient Greece to about 1700. Focus on the development of concepts of nature, human nature, and the state.

 

PLATO AND THE DISCOVERY OF PHILOSOPHY

HONORS 227G (3 cr)

L. Keleher

M ●12:00-2:30 PM

This course introduces students to Plato. No philosopher (with the possible exception of Aristotle) has had a greater influence on philosophy or on Western civilization. We will study a number of Plato’s dialogues in efforts to investigate his conception of philosophy and several of his influential philosophical arguments and doctrines. Here are some questions we will investigate: Who was the historical Socrates? How does Plato’s philosophical methodology evolve (if at all) in early, middle, and late dialogues? What is virtue? What is the fundamental nature of reality? What are the Forms?  What is Plato’s conception of knowledge? Is philosophical knowledge different from other species of knowledge? If so, in what respects? Requirements: quizzes, in-class exams, a term paper, and a short presentation.

 

THE WORLDS OF ARTHUR

HONORS 234G (3 cr)

G. Lavender

ONLINE

Arthurian texts and traditions from medieval chronicle histories to modern novels. Emphasis on both the continuities of the Arthurian tradition and the diversity of genres, media, and cultures that have given expression to the legend.

 

AREA 6: CREATIVE AND FINE ARTS

ENCOUNTERS WITH ART

HONORS 216G (3 cr)

J. Fitzsimmons

R ● 3:00-5:30 PM

Art often reflects the society that produced it.  Traditionally, art has fulfilled a variety of purposes, addressing such themes as religion (spirituality), politics (propaganda), race and gender, patronage and censorship.  Through slide lectures, videos, field trips, project assignments and a research paper, students will explore the different roles art has played, past and present, to come to an understanding of modern life and aesthetics.

 

VIEWING THE WIDER WORLD:

CULTURAL LESSONS OF NAZISM (Arts and Sciences)

HONORS 317V (3 cr)

A. Orzoff

T ● 3:00-5:30 PM

 

OLD TESTAMENT AS LITERATURE (Arts and Sciences)

HONORS 341V (3 cr)

J. Rochelle

MW ● 1:30-2:45 PM

Old Testament surveys a portion of the thirty-nine canonical books of the Old Testament from a literary approach, centered on the so-called historical-critical method that developed in the 19th C under such figures as Julius Wellhausen. Higher criticism of the texts, their sources, authorship, dating and interdependency has led to deepened insights as well as scholarly conflict. In addition, we will examine several apocryphal books that have continuing importance in our understanding of Old Testament. We will read the Old Testament along with an introduction and some supplementary materials.

 

WORLD DANCE (Education)

HONORS 347V

F. Gilpin

W ● 4:00-6:30 P.M.

This course introduces participants to a variety of dance forms from a cross-cultural perspective focusing on the role of dance in different societies. The course is taught using a modified lecture format, the class will include directed readings and classroom discussions, student research projects and group presentations. Guest lecturers, videos and an experiential movement component supplement classes. This is not an activity class per se, but there will be a small amount of exploration in dance movement from various dance styles.

 

CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVES ON GENDER (Arts and Sciences)

HONORS 387V (3 cr)
K. Jenks

TR ● 9:00-10:15 AM

The history, antecedents, and consequences of sex and gender systems around the world from the perspective of sociology, anthropology, and psychology.

 

LEADERSHIP AND SOCIETY (Education)

HONORS 388V (3 cr)

C. Townley

MW ● 10:30-11:45 AM

Exploration of the multifaceted nature of leadership in modern society through readings and seminar discussion.

 

GREAT THEOREMS: ART AND MATH (Arts and Sciences) 

HONORS 411V (3 cr)

G. Lodder

TR ● 12:00-1:15 PM

Adopts the view of mathematics as art, using original sources displaying the creation of mathematical masterpieces from antiquity to the modern era. Original sources are supplemented by cultural, biographical, and mathematical history placing mathematics in a broad human context.

Prerequisites: Grades of B or better in MATH 192G and any upper-division MATH/STAT course, with an overall GPA of 3.2 or better, or consent of instructor.

 

 

FREE ELECTIVES:

HONORS 400 M01-M07 HONORS THESIS (CRN MAY VARY)
M. Chaiken
TBA ● 3 credits

The honors thesis allows you to work closely with a faculty member on a 3-credit independent study project, which may involve scholarly or scientific research or completion of a creative project. It enables you to synthesize knowledge you have gained in a particular field and provides you with an impressive resume item that can be presented to prospective employers or graduate school deans. You frequently share with faculty in the publication or presentation of research results. You also can use the research material and the written thesis as a basis for master’s level work. If you wish to complete an honors thesis, you will need to submit a proposal to a faculty member. For more information, contact the Honors College Dean. Juniors and seniors with a minimum GPA of 3.5 are eligible. The deadlines for proposals are November 30 for the spring semester and April 30 for the fall semester. The honors thesis is the final stage of the University Honors program. However, qualified students may participate whether or not they are enrolled in the University Honors sequence.

 

HONORS 410.M01 HONORS INTERNSHIP (CRN 24340)
M. Chaiken
TBA ● 3-6 credits

Honors internships are available in each academic department, in some laboratory settings, and with various off-campus organizations. Internships may be taken during the summer or the academic year. The research conducted during an internship can be seen as preparation for the honors thesis. Honors 410 enables honors students to develop independent research projects with professionals in their specialized field of study. In an internship setting, the student and supervisor determine the extent of the research project and the scope of the student’s involvement. Internships are designed for upper-division students with experience in the research area. Qualified students may participate whether or not they are enrolled in the University Honors sequence. Students who wish to take an internship must submit a proposal to the Honors College Dean during the semester prior to the internship Please contact the Honors office for additional information.

Juniors and seniors with a minimum GPA of 3.5 are eligible. The requirements vary with internship. Graded S/U.
NOTE: Honors 410 does not count toward the Honors Certificate or University Honors program unless approved by the Dean of the Honors College.

 

HONORS 420.M01 INDEPENDENT STUDY (CRN 24342)
M. Chaiken
TBA ● 1-3 credits
Students enrolling in Honors 420 may receive credit for independent research and creative projects. To enroll in Honors 420, students, must meet honors eligibility requirements, have the consent of a faculty member who agrees to oversee the project and must prepare a contract for approval by the Honors College Dean.

 

SPECIAL TOPICS

M04: Revolutionary Women

HONORS 421 (3 cr)

M. Al Smadi

W ● 1:30-5:00 PM

 

M05: Feminist Research Methods

HONORS 421 (3 cr)

M. Al Smadi

R ● 4:30-7:00

 

HONORS 422 M01

DIRECTED RESEARCH

M. Chaiken

TBA • 3 credits
Individual research projects supervised by faculty advisors. Consent of instructor required.